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The Business of Photography

Operating a digital photography business is no small task. Our experts cover all the issues related to the business of photography from copyright issues to studio concerns, here.

Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Web Services For Pros

Reduce your workload while improving services for your clients

Web Services For Pros

Imagine the increased profit of selling images you make during an event—a portrait, a wedding, a large corporate function—to hundreds of potential buyers instead of the small circle of people who originally set up the shoot. By uploading your images to a website, anyone to whom you give access can view and purchase these images. If your portrait studio is in Denver, for example, a family member living in New York City can easily order an 11x14-inch print. Beyond the obvious advantage of making the extra sale, there's also the plus of providing an important service for your clients—you take care of their worries about getting a print out to everyone who wants one.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Build A Book To Blow Away The Buyers

Promote your photography with a short-run publication

Build A Book To Blow Away The Buyers

There's much more to a successful photography business than taking a pretty picture. It's a business where there's no shortage of shooters who produce consistently excellent work. In this competitive environment, you need to step from behind the camera and market yourself to create an awareness of you and your work. For some, this takes the form of a promotional card that's sent out to thousands of current and hopefully future clients. For others, it involves the production of short-run bound books designed to serve as an introduction or a refresher of a photographer's work to a client.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Security

For security and convenience, take a copy of your photo library with you

Security

Think “insurance policy.” Your digital files are your most important asset as a working photographer. No matter how secure your studio or how frequent your backups, if you lose your images, you lose income.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Digital Asset Management

Keeping track of the images that pay the bills requires a foolproof system

Digital Asset Management

Film required a simple filing system. Mine consisted of slide sheets grouped by subject and stored in a file cabinet. I maintained simple notes on the slide mounts for dates, subject and location, plus a basic database. This worked well for me—until I went digital.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Sometimes A Lens Is Just A Lens

Being a professional photographer is full of emotional ups and downs. Managing the rough times leaves you in a position to reach ever higher levels of success and creativity

Sometimes A Lens Is Just A Lens

Within the psyche of the creative photographer resides a delicate balance between knowledge and ego. We're a band of visual storytellers. Perceptually, we're consumed by capturing or creating moments, those instances when an accidental collision of timing, your library of knowledge and a splash of instinct occur to yield an epic photo. And while we live for those precious few moments, the time in between them can be about as smooth as a rubber raft in a monsoon.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Rental Studios 101

Whether you want to avoid the expense of maintaining your own facility or need a place for a special job, rental studio space offers a lot more than a big room

Rental Studios 101

With skyrocketing real-estate prices and leasing rates, there's a clear trend among professional photographers to unload the expense of a studio space, bringing the administration of the business into lower-cost environments. If you're considering this kind of a move, it's likely because your cost-benefit analysis works out better without a full-time shooting space at your disposal.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Getting Through The Down Time

The unique lifestyle that we have as professional photographers can be challenging when the work isn't flowing in

Getting Through The Down Time

“What do you do all day?” she asked. She was an upwardly mobile, fabulous clothes-wearing corporate mover who made truckloads more money than I did. She was 23 and calling me out. Her assumption was that a 23-year-old photographer like me plodded through the day pretending to be important and made very little money. To dispel that rumor, I immediately ordered a round of drinks for her and her five friends. Everyone was impressed and, for the moment, I quelled the condescending suits. I quietly excused myself and called my credit card company from the bathroom to make sure I had enough room left to cover the looming tab.

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Tuesday, June 5, 2007

Offsite Asset Management

New services do much more than provide safe storage for your image files

Offsite Asset Management

For the past few years, we've been operating under a sort of ad-hoc series of image-delivery options. Falling back on the usual way of doing business, professional photographers have sent digital files to clients on CD or DVD or, more recently, have used the Internet and FTP technology. Image management, storage and delivery will become a more streamlined and standardized process in the future. Some of the leading companies are already moving to act like a hub in a wheel, interfacing between the photographer at one end and the client at the other.

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Friday, June 1, 2007

Photojournalism In The Age Of YouTube

For freelance photojournalists, these are chaotic times. But in chaos there's opportunity if you have the daring to go for it.

Photojournalism In The Age Of YouTube

The age of traditional freelance photojournalism is no more. Newspaper and magazine markets are shrinking. Editorial budgets are at an all-time low. Assignments and opportunities have decreased dramatically, even for the top-tier photographers. The glory days of months-long assignments with large advances and a big chunk of magazine space waiting at the end of the job are gone, too. In these changing times, freelance photojournalists can still make a living and fulfill the calling to get the story out by adapting to a new paradigm.

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