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Professional Photo Gear

Trust our in-depth articles and reviews to help you flush out the digital photo equipment that best suits you.

Thursday, May 24, 2007

High-End Printers For Your Studio

The current generation of professional-level inkjet printers can give your studio a steady stream of lucrative print business

High-End Printers For Your Studio

With the exception of Epson, many of these improvements have been slow to arrive in the large-format printers that are preferred by many pros and studios. For the purposes of this article, large format is defined as printers capable of 17-inch and wider prints on either sheet or roll media.

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Thursday, May 24, 2007

Hi-Tech Studio: Portable Hard Drives

Take copies of your most important files wherever you go, with the peace of mind that only redundant data provides

Hi-Tech Studio: Portable Hard Drives

Most of us wear several hats in addition to photographer, one of them being archivist. That used to mean organizing and storing film; today it means managing multiple copies of images, from the original RAW file through numerous versions for different end uses. What hasn't changed is the importance of safeguarding our images, making data backup perhaps the most important step in our workflow.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Camera Systems In The Digital Age

Today as camera manufacturers control all aspects of image capture and processing, it's time to reexamine what it means to buy into a system

Camera Systems In The Digital Age

In the photo press, the “designed for digital” discussion has tended to focus on lens design from the perspective of correcting for issues that are unique to digital sensors. For instance, image sensors, and the filters in front of image sensors, have a tendency to reflect some light back to the lens. To counter this, new coatings have been developed for the filters and the rear lens elements. This kind of innovation is certainly significant, but to think that “designed for digital” ends with new multi-coatings only hints at the real potential of a digital system.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

The 10 Megapixel Club

When you need resolution and the compactness of an SLR, these are the four current models you'll want to check out

The 10 Megapixel Club

There's no question that D-SLRs are hot right now. Manufacturers who had one or two in their lineups a few years ago are rapidly bulking up their offerings to include a range of models that cover the amateur buyer up to the professional. For pros who need the most resolution possible, we're looking at the four 35mm-form factor D-SLRs with image sensors of 10 megapixels and higher—the Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II, Canon EOS 5D, Nikon D2x and Nikon D200.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Building A Pro Workstation

What to consider when upgrading your Macintosh or Windows hardware

Building A Pro Workstation

Whether you prefer Macintosh or Windows, keeping your hardware up to date is essential to take full advantage of the latest software and peripherals. Photography is a competitive business, and current equipment helps ensure that you can meet your client's demanding deadlines and deliver impeccable images without a hiccup.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Do You Need A Full-Frame D-SLR?

There are significant advantages to D-SLRs that are designed around sub-full-frame image sensors. Before you decide that only full-frame will do, consider all the angles.

Do You Need A Full-Frame D-SLR?

For the better part of the last three years, one of the biggest buzz topics for pro photographers going digital was the full-frame camera—an SLR with an image sensor that's physically the same size as a frame of 35mm film. Along with the implication of higher resolution, these cameras have the added benefit of not requiring users to apply a magnification factor to their lenses in order to determine the apparent focal length. In the past few months, however, several advancements call into question the superiority of the full-frame sensor.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Don't Panic! - Memory Disasters

When the unthinkable happens and your memory card becomes corrupt, it's important that you keep calm and apply the right tool

Don't Panic! - Memory Disasters

At some point in all of our careers, it's going to happen. A disaster will strike and, for the briefest of moments, we'll consider sending the assistant to find Dr. Kevorkian's contact information. What kind of disaster could create such an extreme reaction? For a photographer, only a loss of images could make you want to have Suicide Hotline on your cell phone's speed dial.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Dealing With Viewing Distance

Creating accurate viewing conditions is critical when evaluating your images, and it's something no one seems to be talking about—until now

Dealing With Viewing Distance

There's a fundamental flaw in digital imaging today. You simply cannot view a pixel-based image on a computer display that gives a true interpretation of what it will look like printed on paper.

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Tuesday, May 22, 2007

Next-Generation Medium-Format Cameras And Backs

The reports of the death of medium format in a digital age seem to have been greatly exaggerated

Next-Generation Medium-Format Cameras And Backs

If you're reading this, there's a good chance you own a digital camera. That's a rather safe assumption, as digital cameras have become a regular part of the modern professional photographer's life. It's not equally safe, however, to assume that most pros shoot digitally with a medium-format camera.

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