The Best Of The Best

A look at the top pro DSLRs available today from 35mm and medium-format camera models
By The Editors
There are two main types of DSLRs: Those based on the 35mm SLR form factor and those based on medium-format. In a nutshell, today's pro 35mm-type DSLRs are extremely versatile do-it-all cameras that deliver a combination of high image quality and performance with action subjects and in low light in…

Time To Lose The Mirror

New interchangeable-lens mirrorless cameras are threatening to take the place of your DSLR
By Staff
When rangefinder cameras came along in the early part of the 20th century, they revolutionized photography. Designed to use 35mm movie film with its rugged film base and sprocket system for advancing frames, 35mm rangefinders ushered in a new era of compact, fast cameras that were mated with ultra-high-level optics.…

Dedicated To Motion

The advantages of working with a video camera for filmmaking or broadcast
By David Willis
Despite offering much larger-format sensors than those you find in a typical camcorder, the problem with using your primary still camera for video is that a number of accessories will be required to gain the same advantages that a dedicated camcorder system has right out of the box. Camcorder bodies…

Monochrome Specialists

Dedicated black-and-white cameras eliminate the sharpness-robbing Bayer array and anti-aliasing filter to create the sharpest images possible
By Staff
Many digital photographers do monochrome photography with their regular color digital cameras. This provides a couple of benefits. First, if you shoot RAW, you can process your images to color or monochrome. If you use the camera's monochrome mode, you'll see the images in black-and-white on the LCD monitor, including…

Do You Use Any Aliases?

Is the anti-aliasing filter still necessary or even useful in modern, high-resolution digital camera systems? Several manufacturers are eliminating them from their highest-resolution models.
By Staff
Digital image sensors consist of a grid of light-sensitive photodiodes (pixels). When you make an exposure, each pixel receives a certain amount of light—a certain number of photons—according to the brightness of the portion of the scene being photographed that's focused at that pixel. Inherent in this process is the…

So Retro!

The proliferation of high-end, back-to-the-future, retro-design cameras has style as well as substance
By The Editors
"Retro"-look serious cameras are hot today. Besides the nostalgia factor, they provide their users with a sense of style. We wouldn't trade the technology of our recent DSLRs and mirrorless cameras for that of the old 35mm film cameras, much less earlier digital cameras, but there's something to be said…
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