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Digital Imaging Tech

When it comes to digital imaging and photography there are a lot of variables. Trust our articles on digital photography technology to make sense of pixel counts, file formats and everything in-between.

Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Comeback - Medium-Format Resurgence

Medium-format is experiencing a resurgence. The dire predictions of a few years ago are being replaced by guarded optimism amidst higher-resolution products that are more portable and more affordable.

Comeback - Medium-Format Resurgence

Thanks to the steady rise in quality and popularity of 35mm-format digital SLRs, medium-format manufacturers have spent much of this decade fighting for their proverbial lives. Add to that the early limitations of high price and low portability in its digital systems, and medium-format seemed poised to disappear.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

The Futility Of CMYK

Myth: A big color space with 16-bit color guarantees visibly better results on a printed page

The Futility Of CMYK

I wish that were true. The printed page can be a frustrating place for a photographer. Sometimes images look better there, sometimes worse. Like many photographers, I once thought a publication simply took an image, “translated it” into printing plates of some sort, then worked to match the photo to the page. With that line of thinking, it's easy to then believe that a photo should perfectly match its printed version; if it doesn't, someone screwed up.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

The Digital Negative Format

Adobe's proposed standard RAW file format could be the key for the long-term protection and viability of image files

The Digital Negative Format

Adobe Systems, Inc., has announced a standard RAW file format initiative called Digital Negative (DNG). Since Photokina and Photo Plus Expo last fall, there has been much discussion regarding DNG with a certain degree of skepticism exhibited by photographers, camera companies and the photography industry in general. Why did Adobe, a software company, introduce a standard RAW file format and what are its motives? Are camera companies going to adopt the standard? The most important question to many photographers is, Why should we care one way or another?

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Friday, June 1, 2007

What'’s Next For Professional D-SLRs?

In the top echelon of digital cameras, we're seeing a change in priorities from the major manufacturers

What'’s Next For Professional D-SLRs?

In March, the photo industry made its annual pilgrimage to the Las Vegas Convention Center for the Photo Marketing Association trade show, PMA. This year at PMA, the story for professional photographers was particularly interesting. In recent years, the rumor mill prior to PMA had been working hard, as cameras, software, printers and accessories were being unveiled in droves. At the high end where professionals make a living, recent years have been particularly fruitful as nontraditional players have leapt into PMA, making big splashes with revolutionary products, and at the same time, the "usual suspects" of the industry have used the show to make their biggest product announcements.

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Thursday, May 31, 2007

Is There A Medium-Format Digital In Your Future?

When it comes to ultimate digital image quality, nothing beats medium-format cameras and digital backs. The word 'medium' might be tepid—the image quality is anything but.

Is There A Medium-Format Digital In Your Future?

Issues of size have always impacted image quality and changed the course of camera design. In the days of film, larger cameras delivered the best image quality, while smaller cameras provided portability and ease of use. Medium-format cameras have long been a popular professional choice because they strike an ideal balance between quality, portability and ease of use.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2007

All About Image Sensors

At the heart of every digital camera is an electronic marvel

All About Image Sensors

Millions of photographers are purchasing digital cameras every year, and all of them seem to understand the direct correlation between a camera's sensor and the resulting quality of their photographs. That knowledge is common, but too often cursory.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2007

The Bit-Depth Decision

8-bit versus 16-bit workflow is among the least understood aspects of photography for most professionals. This primer will get you up to speed quickly.

The Bit-Depth Decision

Within the field of photography and digital imaging, a number of debates are argued by users and experts: Nikon versus Canon, Mac versus Windows, zoom versus prime lens, RAW versus JPEG—the list goes on and on. Add to that 8-bit versus 16-bit. What's the difference? Is the controversy useful or viable? After reading our primer, you'll have a better idea about where to stand on the issue.

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Tuesday, May 29, 2007

The Road Ahead

With the staggering number of recent changes in the camera industry, professionals are suddenly looking at a shifting group of manufacturers who will be producing the tools of the trade

The Road Ahead

Shakeouts, sell-offs, curious partnerships and bankruptcies—what in hell has been going on in the photo industry? Over the last five years, beginning in 2002 with the forced liquidation of Polaroid's assets, we've seen some strange realignments, consolidations and collaborations. For example, in January 2003, Konica acquired Minolta Corporation. Three years later, the newly formed company completely withdrew from the camera industry (although it's thriving as a business equipment manufacturer). So what's really going on?

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Do You Need A Full-Frame D-SLR?

There are significant advantages to D-SLRs that are designed around sub-full-frame image sensors. Before you decide that only full-frame will do, consider all the angles.

Do You Need A Full-Frame D-SLR?

For the better part of the last three years, one of the biggest buzz topics for pro photographers going digital was the full-frame camera—an SLR with an image sensor that's physically the same size as a frame of 35mm film. Along with the implication of higher resolution, these cameras have the added benefit of not requiring users to apply a magnification factor to their lenses in order to determine the apparent focal length. In the past few months, however, several advancements call into question the superiority of the full-frame sensor.

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