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Advanced Photography Techniques

Photo pros rely on our magazine to cover the most advanced digital photography techniques in-depth.  From color calibration to file formats and everything in between, you can count on the technique advice from our digital photo experts.

Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Double-Processing White Balance

Whether your goal is perfect neutrality or creating an effect, you can use this technique to refine the colors in your images

Double-Processing White Balance

Not all white lights are the same. Differences in white light are commonly described by their color temperatures (rated in Kelvin). The lower the number, the warmer the light; the higher the number, the cooler the light. Light temperature has a significant effect on exposure, calibration, printing and display.

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Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Digital Autopilot - How To Use Photoshop Actions

Use Photoshop Actions to delegate the drudgery

Digital Autopilot - How To Use Photoshop Actions

I'm a digital photographer, not so much because of the digital part, more for the photography. I prefer shooting, but I don't mind the challenges of digital imaging that can take a photograph from good to great. The problem is that shooting and retouching are only part of the equation. So much time is spent managing files—downloading, archiving, proofing, processing—that repeating these tasks on a daily basis is bound to drive any photographer to a realization: automation is essential.

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Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Extending Depth Of Field

Using multiple exposures and sound camera and software technique, you can defy the laws of physics

Extending Depth Of Field

The ability to reproduce detail is one of the essential characteristics that defines the photographic medium. While there are many similarities between the camera eye and the human eye, there are also significant differences between the two. One of the most significant differences is that the camera eye can achieve a much greater area of focus than the human eye can at one time. This has never been more true than today.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

The Enemy Within - Defeating Dust

Dust is a serious issue for digital shooters. If you have persistent dust spots on your image sensor, it might be time to consider that your gear bag could be the culprit.

The Enemy Within - Defeating Dust

Most photographers have never cleaned a camera bag. Basically, you're looking to get rid of dust and other small contaminants. A quick once-over with a vacuum, taking special care to get into cracks and corners, will do a good job of eradicating most of the problem.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Processing The RAW

Photographers in the digital age are inundated with software so Digital Photo Pro talked to the experts to get the ins and outs on two of the most popular RAW processing packages on the market

Processing The RAW

We discuss RAW workflow a lot in the pages of Digital Photo Pro. Having the ability to work smoothly and quickly with RAW files is key to getting the most out of them. It's a simple fact—if you can't make RAW files work efficiently, you'll end up wasting a lot of time or just switch back to JPEG. If we assume you want the power of the RAW file, then JPEGs simply aren't acceptable.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Mysteries Of (Color) Space

We've covered it before and we'll cover it again because the ins and outs of color management begin with a firm grasp of how devices handle color space

Mysteries Of (Color) Space

Technical terms are frequently tossed around like a Frisbee in a park on Sunday. In digital imaging, three such terms are color space, color gamut and profiles. “Use this color space—you'll get better results.” “Is this color within the color gamut?” “What profile are you using?” All are valid questions, but what do they actually mean?

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Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Large-Format Scanning

Discover the alternatives for producing your own scans in-house

Large-Format Scanning

If you shoot or have an extensive archive of large-format negatives or transparencies, the process of converting them into digital files can be costly. When done at a service bureau, each drum scan can run from $30 to $400. Depending on the number of scans you need, this can become prohibitively expensive, which is why many photographers consider the use of scanners to produce digital files in-house.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Digital Asset Management

Keeping track of the images that pay the bills requires a foolproof system

Digital Asset Management

Film required a simple filing system. Mine consisted of slide sheets grouped by subject and stored in a file cabinet. I maintained simple notes on the slide mounts for dates, subject and location, plus a basic database. This worked well for me—until I went digital.

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Working Within Color Spaces

Myth: Color space has the most important effect on color

Working Within Color Spaces

Do you use Adobe RGB? Is sRGB a pro format? Should pros really start using ColorMatch RGB? Or is there some other new color space permutation that will give even better results? The problem with this discussion on color space is that it assumes the digital camera has captured the correct colors in the first place and that all you need is the right color space to get the most from those colors. Digital cameras don't quite work that way, unfortunately.

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