DPP Home Technique Camera Technique Urs Recher: Light Lessons

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Light Lessons

A master of technique walks us through a series of situations and explains how to craft illumination


This Article Features Photo Zoom

Image 6
As the object was transparent, all the lights were placed below or behind it. The acrylic table was white, and as such, we had to protect it properly from the white light on the left side of the Striplite 60. If we didn’t, all the colors would turn out very pale.

lighting
6
Camera Format:
Medium-format
with digital back
Resolution/ISO:
22 MP/ISO 50
Focal Length:
40mm
Shutter Speed:
1 sec.
ƒ-stop: ƒ/11

lighting 1) Picolite with Fresnel spot attachment and blue gel filter
2) Striplite 60 with a turquoise gel filter on the right side
3) Pulso Spot 4 with 150mm spot attachment
4) Small cardboards to limit the amount of white light falling on the table
5) White acrylic with the matte side up
6) Yellow gel filter

Image 7

Of all the open reflectors, the Par has the highest light output (up to 11⁄2 stops more than a P70). It’s the best choice for such a dark and spacious location. If the lamp head (there are three Pulso G lamp bases here) is equipped with a matte-protecting glass, the coverage of the Par reflector is nicely center-weighted. The blue light was daylight, and the statue on the right was additionally illuminated with a tungsten spot.

lighting
7

Camera Format:
Medium-format with digital back
Resolution/ISO:
22 MP/ISO 50
Focal Length: 40mm
Shutter Speed:1 sec.
ƒ-stop: ƒ/11

lighting
1) Reflector Par on a Pulso G lamp base as the main light to the ceiling
2) Reflector Par on a Pulso G lamp base as an accent light to the back wall
3) Reflector Par on a Pulso G lamp base as a fill-in for the foreground
4) Camera


 

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