In Your Face: Photography In The Age Of Virtual Reality

Photography In The Age of Virtual Reality
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Just as this issue was going to press, Pokémon GO swept the country. Overnight it seemed like everyone was looking face-down at their phones, flicking pretend balls at pretend creatures. Thanks to the intelligent use of a smartphone’s camera, developer Niantic is able to superimpose the various wild Pokémon in a video stream of the real world, a... Read more

DxO OpticsPro 11

The latest iteration of DxO’s RAW Raw converter and image processing software, OpticsPro 11, offers a couple of new features that really piqued our interest.
DxO OpticsPro 11 - Herbie After
DxO is best known for DxOMark.com, a website that publishes a vast database of quantitative measurements for thousands of lenses and cameras. That information is not gathered for consumer information but to power its image-editing software. The DxO suite of tools uses the analysis of the imaging characteristics of camera equipment to correct any inherent... Read more

Going Retro: Antiquing In The Digital Darkroom

Take your portraiture down Memory Lane with some easy and versatile after-capture techniques
Going Retro: Antiquing In The Digital Darkroom
Oliver “Pork Chop” Anderson was an impromptu tap dancer on New Orleans street corners for many years. I photographed him on Polaroid 55 P/N film for a gallery exhibit themed around characters in the picturesque French Quarter during Mardi Gras. To connect Pork Chop to his folksy style of entertainment and also to the historic neighborhood where... Read more

The Art Of Seeing Details

Legendary photorealistic illustrator Bert Monroy knows how to pay attention to the little things, a skill all photographers should develop

It’s not often that we profile an illustrator in Digital Photo Pro, but Bert Monroy isn’t your average artist. He’s part painter, part retoucher, and as far as we can tell, part camera. Monroy’s complex, intricate work includes a level of detail that seems impossible for a human to appreciate, let alone duplicate. For decades, Monroy has not... Read more

Pulling Stills From Motion

Thanks to the resolution of 4K video, photographers can shoot motion and pull out client-worthy still images

The moving images we see when we watch videos and movies are really just an optical illusion, a trick played by our brain when it’s shown a certain number of images in a short enough time. At about 30 images per second, the motion caused by this stream of still images becomes indistinguishable from the motion we perceive from actual moving objects.... Read more

Monochrome Conversion

Instead of always taking a one-click solution, learn how to take control over the subtle tones to create richer, more nuanced black-and-white images

There’s no denying the classical appeal of black-and-white photography. Whilst a certain style of color, for example, Kodachrome of the ’80s, or the pale washed-out negatives of the ’60s and ’70s, or Velvia of the ’90s, evokes the nostalgia of a certain period in time, the very lack of color has the completely opposite... Read more

DPP Solutions: New Features In Lightroom 5

The latest version of Adobe’s workhorse software has some particularly useful tools

2013 has been a big year for Adobe. Their biggest announcement, of course, was the change in licensing of their software to a pay-as-you-go subscription model facilitated through their Creative Cloud service. Around the same time as the Creative Cloud announcement, and almost lost in the din of controversy that it generated, was the Lightroom 5 Public... Read more

Animate your Stills

The latest trend for photos online is making parts of them move. We’ll show you how to do it

Cinemagraphs are in. If you haven’t heard the term, a cinemagraph is a still photo that has some part of it animated. These images are meant for web display, and they’re a great example of how digital means for displaying images are bringing new aesthetics and possibilities. A cinemagraph is different from a video clip in that only a portion... Read more

Heresy In Library Organization

Keep track of an ever-expanding digital archive by getting things right from the start

Scanning the horizon, there are so-called workflow tutorials everywhere you look. Each and every one of them is promoted under the guise that it will help you become "fast and efficient." But what fast and efficient really means for most of the gurus out there is automating everything, and trying to do all 10 steps (or whatever) of the workflow... Read more

Take More Control Over Highlights And Shadows

Use new controls in Lightroom 4 and Adobe Camera Raw 7 to fine-tune the yin and yang of highlights and shadows

Just when you’re becoming comfortable with image controls in your editor of choice, an update comes along and changes everything, so I sympathize that it sometimes feels like you’re aiming at a moving target. But no matter what image processor you’re using, I always try to urge photographers to think of "image correction"... Read more

The Raw File Shuffle

How to keep organized and sane when you’re working and reworking your RAW files.

Adobe Photoshop has been around for 21 years now. Given that, I think it’s safe to say that we’re finally dealing with an adult. For the better part of that 21 years, Photoshop was the place where you went to work on, to crop, to color-correct or to manipulate, more or less, one image at a time. In the process, Photoshop became synonymous... Read more

DPP Solutions: Get Connected

A quick guide to the interfaces for video and audio that you’ll encounter as you get into working with motion

Connecting a DSLR to a peripheral used to be simple. You had a USB cable, a card reader—maybe USB or FireWire—and you were done. Images could move from camera to computer fast and easy. Times have changed, and now DSLRs can connect to TVs, projectors, computers and other devices. You’re shooting stills and HD video, and you may be recording sound... Read more
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