The DSLR Is Still King

While mirrorless cameras offer advantages such as a small form factor and versatility, the optical viewfinders, high-speed frame rates and powerful processors of top-end DSLRs keep them on the throne

Mirrorless camera manufacturers like Fujifilm, Olympus, Panasonic and Sony are in an arms’ race with the more traditional DSLR manufacturers—mainly, Canon and Nikon—a race that’s fueling an incredible rush of technological development and innovative product design. There’s a buzz and an excitement in the camera industry that has... Read more

Colby Brown Made The Switch

The world traveler switched to Sony’s a7 line of mirrorless cameras because they were so much smaller. He’s stayed with them because they are so much better.

Colby Brown might best be described as a humanitarian photographer. He travels the world, camera in hand, looking to help those who are most in need. Along the way he’s built a beautiful portfolio of dramatic landscape and travel photos, but it’s making a difference with his camera that motivates him. Trained as a first responder, Brown... Read more

4K Vs. 5K Video Displays

What’s the best way to take advantage of today’s new display standards?

Spend any time in a camera store (or the camera department of a big-box store), and you’ll notice that more and more cameras are touting their ability to capture video in 4K. Where HD video capabilities were a selling point just a few years ago, full-blown 4K has swept the market. What’s The Big Idea? Video standards are named according... Read more
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Full-Frame Roundup

For most pros, the full-frame format is the tool of choice for the bulk of their work. The range of what’s available has grown, and we break down some of the new options.

A few years ago, it looked like the major camera manufacturers were on the verge of all but completely eliminating full-frame products. That has changed, and today there are more full-frame options available than ever before. For pros, especially fashion-oriented pros, a full-frame DSLR is the tool of choice. Here’s a look at what’s available... Read more

Here Comes The Resolution

Wedding work is ideally suited for the highest-res cameras. Which one is best for your work?

Back in the film era, medium-format cameras were the hot choice for wedding photographers because their larger negatives could deliver much better image quality than 35mm SLRs (35mm originally was known as "miniature format"). But, as digital took over, so did the "full-frame" 35mm DSLR for pro wedding photography. DSLRs offer better,... Read more

Zeiss Batis Lenses Arrive

Designed to work in tandem with the Sony a7 series, the new Batis 25/2 and 85/1.8 optics deliver sharp image quality and vivid color

Sony and Carl Zeiss have long had a strategic partnership—you’ll find the blue-and-white Zeiss badge on products ranging from the company’s compact cameras to Sony-designed lenses for the company’s flagship Alpha series. With the release of their first two Batis lenses, which are only available for the Sony E-mount (such as the a7R... Read more

DPP Solutions: Lighting In A Box

The Elinchrom BRX 500/500 two-light kit provides on-location lighting that’s on par with studio gear back home

Location photographers often have to make compromises when it comes to lighting, opting to carry an unreasonable amount of lighting gear in order to achieve a look similar to studio lighting, or dramatically scale back the power and performance of the studio for weight and cost savings. The Elinchrom BRX 500/500 two-light to-go set aims to address those... Read more

Moving To Motion

Key gear to take your movie work from static to dynamic

Most professional photographers make their first forays into motion by leveraging their still photography equipment. Everything, from the motion-capable DSLR to the usual collection of lenses to the tripod and head, was ported from still capture to motion capture. Any prolonged work in shooting motion requires some additional gear. Continuous... Read more

Hi-Tech Studio: Strobes On The Go

With a combination of light weight, portability and high power, monolights are serious tools for wedding photographers who need more than an on-camera flash

There are two basic types of studio flash: powerpack-and-heads systems and monolights. The former provides a lot of power and control, but is a bit unwieldy, and the cables connecting the lamp heads to the powerpack are just waiting to trip someone. Monolights are self-contained; the lamp head and the powerpack are built into a single unit. Like the... Read more

Monochrome Digital Cameras

Dedicated black-and-white digital cameras can deliver better and sharper images for those who don’t have a need for color

There are three basic ways to produce a monochrome (black-and-white) image with a digital camera: Shoot it that way using your camera’s monochrome mode; convert a color image to monochrome using your RAW converter, Photoshop or specialized monochrome software; or shoot with a monochrome digital camera. Using your camera’s monochrome mode... Read more